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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of people out here at jpl about the prospect of putting curiosity down at this location and about the pictures and ideas that will come back right away. take a listen to what they said. >> there's a lot of intellectual investment. the team has developed a truly fantastic, novel architecture that is the product of our imagination. it is exactly what we think it should be. so we are all in on this. >> reporter: they are definitely all in, and we can give you kind of a close up look of what curiosity pretty much looks like. this is obviously not curiosity itself, it's a model. it gives you an idea. about the size of an suv, and the technology on this, kelly, is unbelievable. >> as you've heard, they're all in, and if all goes well, what will this rover be doing when it actually it was down? >> reporter: well, you can get an idea. we have animation but also from ththe --live look as well. this rover -- the best way to put it. if you've been to the grand canyon or seen pictures, you've seen stripes of rock going all the way down the canyon. each one of those stripes is a slice of life.
the university of california in davis, the team chief from jpl, and doug allison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> we had another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave flawlessly and executed all the planned activities successfully after a period is a good time to point out that the teen operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly and completing all planned activities is well-preparedsol 3 activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to upgrade our ver.ware on the rollove we needed new flight software load that is optimized for the service garrett kern we want to switch to a new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting, the day after tomorrow. we have to do a little prep work for that activity. refit of some files to get ready to for the software transition garrett kern the other thing was to check out some more of our instruments. we checked out the instruments and that all past successfully and are all in great shape as far as we know. that is a great sign. no anomaly showed up in any
watkins, the mission manager. miguel from jpl the chief engineer. sarah from jpl she is the high- rise investigation scientist. and john of caltech the project scientist of the mission. >> good morning everyone. welcome to mars, welcome back to march if he were here last night. the surface mission of curiosity has begun. for a long time, those of us on the project knew we had to go through some big events. but we built this rover not just to land on mars but to actually try weimar's and execute a beautiful science mission. we have ended one phase of the mission and to be a joy a lot of folks on our team. another part has just begun. it is really the fundamental reason we built a rover. we are just starting admission. we are not ending it. two hours after landing. just before 1:00 a.m., curiosity called us from mars odyssey. mars odyssey was overhead. it comes around two hours later. mars has rotated. it was still over the horizon. we were able to have a short talk with curiosity. she told us she is in service nominal mode. she quickly transitioned to surface and nominal mode. not in sa
is yet to come. we will start with the question and answer part. we will start here at jpl. wait for the microphone runner to get to you. we will go in the first row first. state your name and affiliation. >> irish television. could we get times on the major events for the hga deploy and mast. >> i will provide this to you after this. >> if you could talk about the geology. there seems to be three distinct ideological regions. is that the thermal inertia is known as? >> i've been so busy but this mahli -- with this mahli step. you can see the heat shield is on the surface with lots of small creatures. curiosity is on a surface that has a rounded hills and your small creatures. north of curiosity is this leiter toned terrain with lots of basins and pets. if it was up to me i would go to where those three come together. as a starting point. [laughter] you can start to get a flavor of what is going on here. do you want to say anything? >> i just made that up. >> we're going to take another question. it was in the same row but two people to the left. >> hello. i come from france. you
. john blackstone is at jpl in pasadena, california. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. i think we can safely say this morning that the jet propulsion lab is the happiest place on earth. because the "curiosity" over, the car-sized rover, this is just a model, the real thing is safely on the surface of mars. it's such a complex landing that some observers gave the chances of success at no better than 50/50. nobody had ever done anything like this before. and it was all happening 154 million miles away. >> we're just under six minutes to entry. >> in mission control, the tension was obvious as the spacecraft approached mars to begin what was called seven minutes of terror. but with each successful stage of the entry, confidence grew. >> parachute deploy. [ applause ] >> nothing was certain, however, until "curiosity" was confirmed to have landed safely on martian soil. >> touchdown confirmed we are safe on mars. [ cheering ] >> as the celebration began, mission control seemed to lose control. many involved had been working on this mars rover for a decade. >> lift-off. >>
. >> i love this guy. >> the mohawk guy was a flight director at the mars science laboratory, the jpl there. he is helping the mars rover curiosity land. he apparently cuts a different hairdo for each landing. this one set the world on fire here. on twitter overnight i was seeing so many tweets about the mohawk guy. quite handsome, by the way. >> he is kind of handsome. he's got red in there. >> he's got red, yellow stars. good news, he went from 200 twitter followers to 10,000 after curiosity landed. >> his mohawk needs a twitter alias i think. >>> this morning's top stories straight ahead. we'll have new details and stories from inside a sikh temple. we're speaking the a relative of the temple leader who is being called a hero this morning. you're watching "early start." fore! no matter what small business you are in, managing expenses seems to... get in the way. not anymore. ink, the small business card from chase introduces jot an on-the-go expense app made exclusively for ink customers. custom categorize your expenses anywhere. save time and get back to what you love. the latest
laboratory or jpl. you are steely-eyed missile men and you deserve every missed high five of your celebration. i got to say, it was nice to see that nasa saved money by hiring staff from the local best buy. but, folks -- it's a penny pincher, a penny pincher. and, folks, just cry to conceive of what was achieved this morning. we gently landed a one ton, six-wheel suv 154 million miles from earth. i mean, that onstar lady is getting good. we now have two rovers on the surface of mars and three satellites orbiting it. basically if the planets are a tray of donuts, we have now licked mars. it's ours. we already had the moon, we just need venus for the monopoly and we can start building hotels on them. >> welcome back to "morning joe." sam stein and katty kay are still with us, along with john meacham in new york. joining us here in washington, the host of "hardball" chris matthews. and author of "jack kennedy." >> chris, you came on set and said you like what harry reid did. >> how could you like that? >> i liked it because i think obama has needed confederates in the field for most of his life
think it's in the 9s. those engineers at jpl are really good. >> landing on mars has been a tricky thing. 70% of the missions that landed on mars have failed. that's both the u.s. and with russia as well. what are the factors that complicate this? >> the atmosphere of mars is thick enough to heat your spacecraft and melt it on the way in if you don't slow down in the right way. it's thin enough that it's hard to slow down. it's a delicate balance between slowing down fast enough and not slowing down at all. that's what takes this incredibly complicated heat shield parachute rocket sky crane maneuver. >> not to mention, this is something that scientists won't be seeing in real time. there's going to be a delay. why? >> well, it takes 14 minutes at this point for light to get from mars to earth. radio signals too. so this lander will be on the surface of mars in one piece or many for seven minutes before the signal gets back to earth to tell us that it's successful or not. >> we've had missions like this before. what makes this one different in. >> well, this one, it's the size of a smart
you. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> abbottabad in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after injury. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was a damage or not. so t
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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